Question Marks

Title: Writer’s Workshop (Question Marks)

Date: Tuesday, October 30, 2007

Rationale: Students will practice deciding if sentences are questions or just statements, in order to use end marks to communicate different things to the reader.

Objectives: 1) Students will create three questions (written) using question words (who, what, when, where, why, or how)

Standards: (from ICCSD benchmarks)

Writing- Writes with appropriate use of capitalization and ending punctuation

Materials:

  • Chart paper and markers (prepare ahead of time)

Procedure (15 min. approx.)

Lesson Intro: When we write, we are telling the reader different things. That is why we use different ending marks, to show a statement, a question, or an exclamation of excitement.

Lesson:

  • Saying two sentences: You are coming with me now. Are you coming with me now?
  • Ask students which one was a question.
  • Changes in voice, for questions (voice goes up)

Explanation: When we write, readers can’t hear our voice. That is why we use different ending marks to show what we could be saying. How could we tell a reader that we’re asking a question?

  • Show students the sentences that you wrote on the chart paper. (It is cold today. Is it cold today?)
  • Ask them if they can tell which one is a question.

Writing: On chart paper, write I can go home now, and read it aloud.

  • Is this sentence a question?
  • Have a volunteer change the words around to ask a question
    • Changing word order AND adding punctuation can change it into a question.

5 W-question words: Ask students if they know what they already are. They are ‘asking’ words, or question words.

  • WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY, (HOW)
  • Use these words as a start to your question, and come up with 3 questions.
  • Remind students what goes at the beginning of the sentence. At the end?
  • Come up with an example on the chart paper.

Gearing Up:

  • Increase number of questions to write (5)Give students a statement and have them change it into a question.

Gearing Down:

  • Ask students to create one good question.
  • Have them tell you their question first, before their write.
Remind students about parts of complete sentence, capital letter and ending mark.

Assessment:

1) Check students’ WW notebooks for their questions. Did they use the appropriate punctuation? Did their question make sense?

Lesson Success

_______Excellent _________Good _______Fair ______Flop

Lesson template adapted from Amy Schneider

For questions or comments, please contact Mari Hauf